Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBowden, Bradley
dc.contributor.authorBarry, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:11:03Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:11:03Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn0022-1856
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0022185614560157
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/69441
dc.description.abstractThe link between industrial relations and productivity is contentious. It is often argued that particular industrial relations models are more or less conducive to greater productivity. However, this article, in exploring this issue through an examination of the Queensland coal industry since 2001, finds no evidence of such a link. Instead, it finds that the more employer-friendly industrial relations system that has prevailed in Queensland coal mining since 1996 has been associated with both rising (1996-2000 and 2011-2013) and falling (2001-2011) productivity. Instead, the only correlation that seems to hold true is that between the productivity and the state of the labour market. Since 1996, on every occasion that productivity rose (1996-2000 and 2011-2013), employment was falling. Conversely, when employment rose (2001-2011), productivity fell. Suggestively, rising employment was always associated with rising coal prices, while falling employment was always correlated with declining price. If there is no evidence of a link between industrial relations settings and productivity, this study nevertheless finds that a profound recasting of industrial relations has occurred in this sector. This has involved systematic attempts to circumvent not only the unionized workforce, but also, more recently, the Central Queensland coal communities themselves.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent365037 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom48
dc.relation.ispartofpageto71
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalThe Journal of Industrial Relations
dc.relation.ispartofvolume57
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchIndustrial Relations
dc.subject.fieldofresearchApplied Economics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBusiness and Management
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLaw
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode150306
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1402
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1503
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1801
dc.titleRecasting industrial relations: productivity, place and the Queensland coal industry, 2001-2013
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Dept of Employment Relations and Human Resources
gro.rights.copyright© 2015 Industrial Relations Society of Australia. This is the author-manuscript version of the paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.date.issued2015-09-04T04:34:01Z
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBowden, Bradley
gro.griffith.authorBarry, Michael J.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record