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dc.contributor.authorNana, Alisa
dc.contributor.authorSlater, Gary J
dc.contributor.authorHopkins, Will G
dc.contributor.authorHalson, Shona L
dc.contributor.authorMartin, David T
dc.contributor.authorWest, Nicholas P
dc.contributor.authorBurke, Louise M
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:31:22Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:31:22Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn1526-484X
dc.identifier.doi10.1123/ijsnem.2013-0111
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/70079
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The implications of undertaking DXA scans using best practice protocols (subjects fasted and rested) or a less precise but more practical protocol in assessing chronic changes in body composition following training and a specialized recovery technique were investigated. Methods: Twenty-one male cyclists completed an overload training program, in which they were randomized to four sessions per week of either cold water immersion therapy or control groups. Whole-body DXA scans were undertaken with Best Practice (BEST) or Random Activity (RANDOM) protocols at baseline, after 3 weeks of overload training and after a 2 week taper. Magnitudes of changes in total, lean and fat mass from baseline-overload, overload-taper and baseline-taper were assessed by standardization (?mean/SD). Results: The standard deviations of change scores for total and fat-free soft tissue mass (FFST) from RANDOM scans (2-3%) were approximately double those observed in the BEST protocol (1-2%), owing to extra random errors associated with RANDOM scans at baseline. There was little difference in change scores for fat mass. The effect of cold water immersion therapy on baseline-taper changes in FFST was possibly harmful (-0.7%; 90% confidence limits ᱮ2%) with BEST scans but unclear with RANDOM scans (0.9%; Ხ0%). Both protocols gave similar possibly harmful effects of cold water immersion therapy on changes in fat mass (6.9%; ᱳ.5% and 5.5%; ᱴ.3%, respectively). Conclusions: An interesting effect of cold water immersion therapy on training-induced changes in body composition might have been missed with a less precise scanning protocol. DXA scans should be undertaken with the Best Practice Protocol.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherHuman Kinetics
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto25
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Sports Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSports science and exercise
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSports science and exercise not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical physiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4207
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode420799
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3208
dc.titleImportance of Standardized DXA Protocol for Assessing Physique Changes in Athletes
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorWest, Nic P.


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