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dc.contributor.authorWright, Mitchellen_US
dc.contributor.authorMatthews, Benen_US
dc.contributor.authorGreene, Tonyen_US
dc.contributor.authorCock, Ianen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-30T23:00:24Z
dc.date.available2017-11-30T23:00:24Z
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.issn22490159en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.5530/pc.2015.3.3en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/79390
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Anthrax is severe acute disease caused by Bacillus anthracis infections. If untreated, it often results in mortality. High antioxidant plant extracts have documented therapeutic properties as general antiseptics, inhibiting the growth of a wide variety of bacterial species. This study examines the ability of selected high antioxidant Australian plant extracts to inhibit B. anthracis growth. Methods: Solvent extracts were prepared using various high antioxidant Australian fruits and herbs and investigated by disc diffusion assay for the ability to inhibit the growth of an environmental strain of B. anthracis. Their MIC values were determined to quantify and compare their efficacies. Toxicity was determined using the Artemia franciscana nauplii bioassay. The most potent extracts were analysed by non-targeted HPLC-QTOF mass spectroscopy (with screening against 3 compound databases) for the identification and characterisation of individual components in crude plant extracts. Results: Methanolic and aqueous extracts of several high antioxidant plant extract sdisplayed potent antibacterial activity in the disc diffusion assay against B. anthracis. The aqueous and methanolic extracts of lemon aspen, as well as the methanolic extracts of muntries, Illawarra plum and native tamarind were particularly potent growth inhibitors with MIC values<1000 姯mL. Furthermore, all of these extracts were nontoxic in the Artemia fransiscana bioassay, with LC50 values substantially>1000 姯mL. Non-biased phytochemical analysis of the lemon aspen aqueous and methanolic extracts putatively identified 85 compounds and highlighted several that may contribute to the ability of these extracts to inhibit the growth of B. anthracis. Conclusion: The low toxicity of several high antioxidant plant extracts and their potent inhibitory bioactivity against B. anthracis indicates their potential as medicinal agents in the treatment and prevention of anthrax. Lemon aspen is particularly worthy of further study.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherMedknow Publishersen_US
dc.publisher.placeIndiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom173en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto189en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPharmacognosy Communicationsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume5en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchComplementary and Alternative Medicine not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110499en_US
dc.titleGrowth inhibition of the zoonotic bacteria Bacillus anthracis by high antioxidant Australian plants: New leads for the prevention and treatment of anthraxen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
dc.description.versionPublisheden_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2015 Phcog.net. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorMatthews, Ben S.
gro.griffith.authorWright, Mitchell
gro.griffith.authorCock, Ian E.
gro.griffith.authorGreene, Tony C.


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