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dc.contributor.authorCropp, RA
dc.contributor.authorNorbury, J
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-01T01:30:40Z
dc.date.available2017-09-01T01:30:40Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn0036-1445
dc.identifier.doi10.1137/140962528
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/82287
dc.description.abstractMathematical biology/ecology teaching for undergraduates has generally relied on the Lotka-Volterra competition and predator-prey models to introduce students to population dynamics. Students are provided with an understanding of the application of dynamical system theory in simulating and understanding the behavior of the natural world, and they are provided with opportunities to practice phase plane analysis techniques such as deter- mining the stability of equilibrium points and bifurcation analysis. This paper outlines a course in ecological modeling suitable for all students in the life sciences. The course is based on realistic ecological principles, such as using nutrient concentration to measure populations together with explicit resource availability to constrain population growth, and it considers simple Lotka-Volterra systems within this theoretical framework. An advan- tage of this approach is that the widely experimentally observed models of mixotrophy and mutualism can be naturally and simply introduced and analyzed. Continuous variation of models across a trophic level is now possible. Competitors can smoothly change to mu- tualist/mixotroph populations, which can further smoothly change to become predators, synthesizing in simple terms the relationships among trophic interactions within the Lotka- Volterra framework. Standard texts on mathematical ecology do not include mixotrophy, which is central to understanding trophic interactions.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherSociety for Industrial and Applied Mathematics
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom437
dc.relation.ispartofpageto465
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalSIAM Review
dc.relation.ispartofvolume57
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological Mathematics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological Oceanography
dc.subject.fieldofresearchApplied Mathematics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchElectrical and Electronic Engineering
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode010202
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode040501
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0102
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0906
dc.titlePopulation Interactions in Ecology: A Rule-Based Approach to Modeling Ecosystems in a Mass-Conserving Framework
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionPublished
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environment
gro.rights.copyright© 2015 SIAM. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorCropp, Roger A.


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