Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMenon, Saras
dc.contributor.authorLea, Rodney A
dc.contributor.authorIngle, Sarah
dc.contributor.authorSutherland, Michelle
dc.contributor.authorWee, Shirley
dc.contributor.authorHaupt, Larisa M
dc.contributor.authorPalmer, Michelle
dc.contributor.authorGriffiths, Lyn R
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-20T00:33:27Z
dc.date.available2019-03-20T00:33:27Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn0017-8748
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/head.12490
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/89374
dc.description.abstractBackground: Migraine is a highly disabling disease affecting a significant proportion of the Australian population. The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T variant has been associated with increased levels of homocysteine and risk of migraine with aura (MA). Folic acid (FA), vitamin B6, and B12 supplementation has been previously shown to reduce increased levels of homocysteine and decrease migraine symptoms. However, the influence of dietary folate intake on migraine has been unclear. The aim of the current study was to analyze the association of dietary folate intake in the form of dietary folate equivalent, FA, and total food folate (TFF) on migraine frequency, severity, and disability. Methods: A cohort of 141 adult females of Caucasian descent with MA was genotyped for the MTHFR C677T variant using restriction enzyme digestion. Dietary folate information was collected from all participants and analyzed using the “FoodWorks” 2009 package. Folate consumption was compared with migraine frequency, severity, and disability using linear regression. Results: A significant inverse relation was observed between dietary folate equivalent (R2 = 0.201, B = −0.002, P = .045, 95% confidence interval [CI] [−0.004, −0.001]) and FA (R2 = 0.255, B = −0.005, P = .036, 95% CI [−0.009, −0.002]) consumption and migraine frequency. It was also observed that in individuals with the CC genotype for the MTHFR C677T variant, migraine frequency was significantly linked to FA consumption (R2 = 0.106, B = −0.004, P = .029, 95% CI [−0.007, −0.004]). Conclusions: The results from this study indicate that folate intake in the form of FA may influence migraine frequency in female MA sufferers.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto9
dc.relation.ispartofjournalHeadache
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode119999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.titleEffects of Dietary Folate Intake on Migraine Disability and Frequency
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionPost-print
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.
gro.rights.copyright© 2015 American Headache Society. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Effects of Dietary Folate Intake on Migraine Disability and Frequency, Headache, Volume55, Issue2, February 2015, Pages 301-309, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/head.12490. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828039.html)
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorWee, Shirley S.
gro.griffith.authorPalmer, Michelle A.
gro.griffith.authorIngle, Sarah
gro.griffith.authorGriffiths, Lyn
gro.griffith.authorHaupt, Larisa


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record