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dc.contributor.authorMazerolle, Lorraine
dc.contributor.authorRogan, Dennis
dc.contributor.authorFrank, James
dc.contributor.authorFamega, Christine
dc.contributor.authorEck, John
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-01T00:40:39Z
dc.date.available2018-11-01T00:40:39Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/96340
dc.description.abstractAny citizen in the United States can mobilize the local police by dialing 911. Since their introduction 35 years ago, 911 emergency call systems have revolutionized emergency response, especially for police services. However, many 911 systems have become severely over- loaded with nonemergency calls.1 By the mid-1990s, a national movement was under way to implement a universal number to reduce nonemergency calls to 911 call systems. In 1997, the Federal Communications Commission designated 311 as the national nonemergency phone number.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherUS Department of Justice
dc.publisher.placeWashington DC
dc.publisher.urihttps://www.ncjrs.gov/app/publications/abstract.aspx?id=206257
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto4
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode390401
dc.titleCalling 311: Guidelines for Policymakers
dc.typeReport
dc.type.descriptionU2 - Reviews/Reports
dc.type.codeD - Reviews/Reports
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Criminology and Criminal Justice
gro.rights.copyright© 2005 National Institute of Justice (NIJ). The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the publisher’s website for further information.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorMazerolle, Lorraine A.


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