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dc.contributor.authorTownend, G
dc.contributor.authorPendergast, D
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-28T23:41:34Z
dc.date.available2017-08-28T23:41:34Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn1323-9686
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/96471
dc.description.abstractAcademic self-concept relates to students' perceptions of their academic accomplishments, and academic competence and expectations of academic success or failure. Academic self-concept has been identified as being critical for academic success in school as it underpins educational aspirations, academic interest, course selection, and achievement over time. Twice-exceptional students are intellectually gifted with a coexisting disability and hence present as a dual paradox for education systems, both in terms of being gifted and having a disability. The paradox of two, or one, or neither of the exceptionalities being visible in a child in school is due primarily to outward behaviours, lack of community knowledge, and challenges with identification (Vail, 1989). Despite over twenty years of empirical research on twice-exceptional students, the influences on academic self-concept remains virtually unexplored. This research investigates teachers' influences on the school experience of twice-exceptional students and how these influences shape academic self-concept. A case study research design includes both quantitative instrument data and interview data. Findings provide new understandings about teachers' influences on academic self-concept for twice-exceptional students. This research contributes to a gap in the field and leads to a better understanding that can be applied to policy and practice for gifted education.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherAustralian Association for the Education of the Gifted and Talented
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.publisher.urihttp://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=433407041881463;res=IELHSS
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom37
dc.relation.ispartofpageto51
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralasian Journal of Gifted Education
dc.relation.ispartofvolume24
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSpecial Education and Disability
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSpecialist Studies in Education
dc.subject.fieldofresearchOther Education
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode130312
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1303
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1399
dc.titleStudent voice: What can we learn from twice-exceptional students about the teacher’s role in enhancing or inhibiting academic self-concept
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionPublished
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Education and Professional Studies
gro.rights.copyright© 2015 Australian Association for Gifted and Talented Children. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorPendergast, Donna L.
gro.griffith.authorTownend, Geraldine


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