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dc.contributor.convenorWorld Federation of Neurologyen_US
dc.contributor.authorBroadley, Simonen_US
dc.contributor.authorJackie, Deansen_US
dc.contributor.authorStephen, Sawceren_US
dc.contributor.authorAlastair S, Compstonen_US
dc.contributor.editorAndrew Kayeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:35:11Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:35:11Z
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.date.modified2014-10-09T00:55:20Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0022-510X(05)80264-3en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/9825
dc.description.abstractBackground: Recent studies have suggested associations between the risk of developing multiple sclerosis and timing of birth or exposure to younger siblings prior to the age of 6 years. Confirmation of such findings would provide evidence for an as yet unidentified birth-related environmental factor such as early childhood infection. Methods: As part of a national UK survey of autoimmune disease in families with multiple sclerosis we obtained nuclear family history details including date of birth for 571 case families and 351 control families. Diagnosis of multiple sclerosis was confirmed by personal review of cases using the Poser criteria. Results: No association was seen between month of birth and risk of multiple sclerosis when compared with controls and also with UK population data for the same period. Whilst a trend towards earlier birth order was seen in cases, this was not significant and was nullified by correction for latent disease in younger siblings. Mean age gap between affected siblings (n=53) was 5.9 years compared with 5.6 years in controls (P=0.44). There was no significant difference in sibship size between case and control families. Number of years exposed to younger infant siblings in the first 6 years of life showed no significant difference between cases and controls. Conclusions: These data suggest that risk of multiple sclerosis is not affected by season of birth or exposure to younger infant siblings, and therefore do not support a significant birth related environmental factor in susceptibility to this disease. These data are consistent with other studies.en_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.publisher.placeMelbourneen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameWorld Congress of Neurologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleJournal of Clinical Neuroscienceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2005-11-05en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2005-11-11en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationSydneyen_US
dc.rights.retentionNen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode320702en_US
dc.titleMultiple sclerosis, timing of birth, birth order, sibling age gap and exposure to younger siblingsen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE3 - Conference Publications (Extract Paper)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Medicineen_US
gro.date.issued2005
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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