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dc.contributor.authorCherney, Adrian
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Kristina
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-30T04:55:41Z
dc.date.available2018-07-30T04:55:41Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn0004-8658
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0004865815585392
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/99062
dc.description.abstractThe suspect community thesis has been used to explain how and why Muslims have become a stigmatised minority, subject to increased state surveillance and public discourse that constructs Muslims as a potential terrorist threat. Breen-Smyth (2014) argues that a suspect community is generated through national or state security policies and reproduced and reinforced by societal responses and social practices. This influences how Muslims perceive themselves as a suspect community and influences their support for counter-terrorism efforts. This paper will explore the ‘experiential consequences’ of Muslims being stigmatised and labelled as a suspect community and the perceptions this has generated among Muslims living in Australia. We examine how Muslims have reacted to being defined as a terrorist threat and the coping mechanisms they adopt to defend their religious beliefs given Islam is seen by authorities, the media and the public as justifying violence. This paper will explore these issues by reporting results from focus group data collected from Muslims living in Sydney, Brisbane and Melbourne (N = 104 participants in total). Results illustrate how being defined as a suspect community influences the appraisals Muslims have of themselves, their faith, their community and Australian authorities. Implications for counter-terrorism policies are also identified.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSage Publications
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto17
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian & New Zealand Journal of Criminology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolice Administration, Procedures and Practice
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLaw
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160205
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1602
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1801
dc.titleBeing a ‘suspect community’ in a post 9/11 world – The impact of the war on terror on Muslim communities in Australia
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorMurphy, Kristina


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