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dc.contributor.authorVakhitova, Zarina I
dc.contributor.authorReynald, Danielle M
dc.contributor.authorTownsley, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-22T01:55:30Z
dc.date.available2017-12-22T01:55:30Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn1043-9862
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1043986215621379
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/99072
dc.description.abstractWith the advent of the Internet and the emergence of cybercrimes (e.g., cyber stalking, cyber harassment), criminologists have begun to explore the empirical utility of lifestyle exposure and routine activity theories (RATs) to account for personal victimization as a consequence of cyber abuse. Available cyber abuse studies have produced inconsistent empirical support for both models, which has reignited the debate about whether terrestrial theories, such as RAT, will ever be able to adequately explain cybercrimes due to the spatial and temporal disconnect between the theories and the cyber environment. This article reviews existing cyber abuse scholarship, explores potential reasons for the weak empirical support for routine activity and lifestyle exposure theories in cyberspace, and proposes several directions for future research. We suggest that to further our understanding of cyber abuse processes, scholars need to carefully define and operationalize the key theoretical concepts in the light of latest developments in RAT (i.e., addition of new controllers—handlers and place managers, and super controllers), and conduct in-depth qualitative studies, as well as quantitative studies, that employ robust methodological designs and multi-level statistical analyses.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSage Publications
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto20
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Contemporary Criminal Justice
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCauses and Prevention of Crime
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLaw
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160201
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1602
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1801
dc.titleToward the Adaptation of Routine Activity and Lifestyle Exposure Theories to Account for Cyber Abuse Victimization
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Criminology and Criminal Justice
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorTownsley, Michael K.
gro.griffith.authorVakhitova, Zarina I.
gro.griffith.authorReynald, Danielle M.


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