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dc.contributor.authorBonyanian, Zina
dc.contributor.authorRose'Meyer, Roselyn
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-18T00:05:12Z
dc.date.available2019-03-18T00:05:12Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn2156-5783en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/jcr.2015.0011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/99073
dc.description.abstractDiabetes is a common disorder that is characterized by high blood glucose levels, polyuria, and polydipsia. As a result of chronically elevated blood glucose, impaired wound healing is one of the many serious issues that can occur in diabetic patients. Impaired wound healing and vascular disorders are the most prevalent of the diabetic complications and are caused by diminished angiogenesis, decreased lymphangiogenesis, and destruction of endothelial cells. Adenosine is a purine nucleoside, which is a key local stimulator of cell proliferation and wound healing. Adenosine could be activated by interaction with specific adenosine A1, A2A, A2B, and A3 receptors. In addition, occupancy of adenosine receptors (especially the A2A and A2B receptors with adenosine agonists) may accelerate wound healing and reduce proinflammatory cytokine secretion, including tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6. Caffeine is a nonselective antagonist of all the adenosine receptor subtypes and has demonstrated physiological effects in in vitro and in vivo studies. Caffeine also has an antioxidant property that may reduce the risk of diabetes and accelerate wound healing. Furthermore, chronic caffeine increases the number of adenosine receptors in organ systems. Overall, chronic caffeine may have the capacity to decrease the risk of diabetes and improve wound healing through its antioxidant properties and increasing number of adenosine receptors.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherMary Ann Liebert Inc.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto8en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Caffeine Researchen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBasic Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111501en_US
dc.titleCaffeine and its potential role in attenuating impaired wound healing in diabetesen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Medical Scienceen_US
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.en_US
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorBonyanian, Zina
gro.griffith.authorRose'Meyer, Roselyn B.


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