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dc.contributor.authorMcKetin, Rebecca
dc.contributor.authorDawe, Sharon
dc.contributor.authorBurns, Richard A
dc.contributor.authorHides, Leanne
dc.contributor.authorKavanagh, David J
dc.contributor.authorTeesson, Maree
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Ross McD
dc.contributor.authorVoce, Alexandra
dc.contributor.authorSaunders, John B
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-19T01:30:24Z
dc.date.available2018-03-19T01:30:24Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn0376-8716
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2016.01.018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/99116
dc.description.abstractBackground: Methamphetamine use can produce symptoms almost indistinguishable from schizophrenia. Distinguishing between the two conditions has been hampered by the lack of a validated symptom profile for methamphetamine-induced psychiatric symptoms. We use data from a longitudinal cohort study to examine the profile of psychiatric symptoms that are acutely exacerbated by methamphetamine use. Methods: 164 methamphetamine users, who did not meet DSM-IV criteria for a lifetime primary psychotic disorder, were followed monthly for one year to assess the relationship between days of methamphetamine use and symptom severity on the 24-item Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale. Exacerbation of psychiatric symptoms with methamphetamine use was quantified using random coefficient models. The dimensions of symptom exacerbation were examined using principal axis factoring and a latent profile analysis. Results: Symptoms exacerbated by methamphetamine loaded on three factors: positive psychotic symptoms (suspiciousness, unusual thought content, hallucinations, bizarre behavior); affective symptoms (depression, suicidality, guilt, hostility, somatic concern, self-neglect); and psychomotor symptoms (tension, excitement, distractibility, motor hyperactivity). Methamphetamine use did not significantly increase negative symptoms. Vulnerability to positive psychotic and affective symptom exacerbation was shared by 28% of participants, and this vulnerability aligned with a past year DSM-IV diagnosis of substance-induced psychosis (38% vs. 22%, χ2 (df1) = 3.66, p = 0.056). Conclusion: Methamphetamine use produced a symptom profile comprised of positive psychotic and affective symptoms, which aligned with a diagnosis of substance-induced psychosis, with no evidence of a negative syndrome.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom104
dc.relation.ispartofpageto109
dc.relation.ispartofjournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
dc.relation.ispartofvolume161
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology and Cognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode179999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode17
dc.titleThe profile of psychiatric symptoms exacerbated by methamphetamine use
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2016 Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorDawe, Sharon


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