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dc.contributor.authorDuez, J
dc.contributor.authorHolleran, JP
dc.contributor.authorNdour, PA
dc.contributor.authorPionneau, C
dc.contributor.authorDiakite, S
dc.contributor.authorRoussel, C
dc.contributor.authorDussiot, M
dc.contributor.authorAmireault, P
dc.contributor.authorAvery, VM
dc.contributor.authorBuffet, PA
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-20T04:54:26Z
dc.date.available2017-11-20T04:54:26Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn1246-7820
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.tracli.2015.05.004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/99122
dc.description.abstractDuring their lifespan, circulating RBC are frequently checked for their deformability. This mechanical quality control operates essentially in the human spleen. RBC unable to squeeze though narrow splenic slits are retained and cleared from the blood circulation. Under physiological conditions this prevents microvessels from being clogged by senescent, rigid RBC. Retention of poorly deformable RBC is an important determinant of pathogenesis in malaria and may also impact the clinical benefit of transfusion. Modulating the splenic retention of RBC has already been proposed to support therapeutic approaches in these research fields. To this aim, the development of microplates for high throughput filtration of RBC through microsphere layers (microplate-based microsphiltration) has been undertaken. This review focuses on potential therapeutic applications provided by this technology in malaria chemotherapy and transfusion.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier - Masson
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom151
dc.relation.ispartofpageto157
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalTransfusion Clinique et Biologique
dc.relation.ispartofvolume22
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedicinal and Biomolecular Chemistry not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode030499
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.titleMechanical clearance of red blood cells by the human spleen: Potential therapeutic applications of a biomimetic RBC filtration method
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith Institute for Drug Discovery
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorAvery, Vicky M.
gro.griffith.authorDuez, Julien
gro.griffith.authorHolleran, John


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