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dc.contributor.authorPrentice, Matthew J
dc.contributor.authorO'Brien, Kate R
dc.contributor.authorHamilton, David P
dc.contributor.authorBurford, Michele A
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-25T04:44:26Z
dc.date.available2017-07-25T04:44:26Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn0948-3055
dc.identifier.doi10.3354/ame01751
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/99136
dc.description.abstractPhosphorus (P) is an essential element for phytoplankton growth, and in recent years our understanding of P use based on kinetics has been overturned with new knowledge of the complexity of P utilization. However, much of this knowledge is based on culture studies with individual species. Our objective was to measure the effect of dissolved inorganic P (DIP) concentrations on DIP uptake rates by phytoplankton, in the context of seasonal phytoplankton succession in a large monomictic, DIP-depauperate lake. We demonstrated an inverse relationship between surface DIP concentration and DIP uptake rate, with substantially higher uptake rates occurring under thermally stratified, DIP-depauperate conditions. The combination of surface water DIP concentration and water temperature explained 50.3% of the variation in uptake rates. DIP concentration explained the majority of variation, with a concentration of 4.75 µg DIP l-1 appearing to be a transition between low- and high-affinity uptake. Variability below 4.75 µg DIP l-1 was further explained by water temperature. High-affinity DIP uptake was most common when Cyanobacteria dominated the phytoplankton assemblage. We validated our field results by conducting a DIP starvation study on an isolate of a dominant cyanobacterium, Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii. High-affinity uptake was demonstrated as the culture became progressively starved of P. Our findings indicate that rapid DIP scavenging via high-affinity uptake is advantageous under DIP-depauperate conditions during the summer-stratification period. It may also contribute to the switch from diatom/cryptophyte/chlorophyte dominance to cyanobacterial dominance in summer. This study also has implications for phytoplankton–nutrient models, which typically do not incorporate high-affinity P uptake.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherInter Research
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom139
dc.relation.ispartofpageto153
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAquatic Microbial Ecology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume75
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEcosystem Function
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEcology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMicrobiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050102
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0602
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0605
dc.titleHigh- and low-affinity phosphate uptake and its effect on phytoplankton dominance in a phosphate-depauperate lake
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environment
gro.rights.copyright© 2015 Inter Research. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBurford, Michele A.
gro.griffith.authorHamilton, David P.
gro.griffith.authorPrentice, Matthew J.


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