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dc.contributor.authorPagan, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorOwnsworth, Tamara
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, Skye
dc.contributor.authorFleming, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorHonan, Cynthia
dc.contributor.authorTogher, Leanne
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-10T03:13:31Z
dc.date.available2018-08-10T03:13:31Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn1839-5252en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/BrImp.2015.34en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/99152
dc.description.abstractLittle is known about clinicians’ experiences in rehabilitation for people with traumatic brain injury (TBI). This survey study aimed to investigate clinicians’ scope of practice, perceived barriers to practice, factors influencing confidence levels and professional development preferences. Participants included 305 clinicians (88% female, 97% aged 20–60 years) from psychology (28%), occupational therapy (27%), speech pathology (15%), physiotherapy (11%), social work (6%), rehabilitation medicine (3%) and nursing (3%) disciplines. Survey results indicated that goal setting, client or family education, and assessment for rehabilitation, were the most common activities across all disciplines (>90%). Client-related barriers, family-related barriers and client–therapist relationship barriers were more frequently selected than workplace context and professional skill barriers (p < .05). Clinicians working with clients with mild TBI reported significantly fewer barriers (p < .05); yet, they were less confident in overcoming barriers than clinicians working with clients with more severe TBI (p < .001). Clinicians with fewer years of experience (<2 years) reported significantly lower confidence in overcoming barriers than clinicians with 2–10 years and >10 years of experience (p < .01). The most commonly selected professional development areas included new interventions and therapies, translating rehabilitation research into everyday practice and client specific topics. These findings provide a unique multidisciplinary perspective on clinicians working in TBI rehabilitation in Australia. Understanding of the perceived barriers to practice and professional development needs may guide training and support initiatives for clinicians which, in turn, may enhance the quality of brain injury rehabilitation.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom173en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto195en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBrain Impairmenten_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume16en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology)en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170101en_US
dc.titleA survey of multidisciplinary clinicians working in rehabilitation for people with traumatic brain injuryen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
dc.description.versionPost-printen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychologyen_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2015 Australian Society for the Study of Brain Impairment. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
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