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dc.contributor.authorHesmondhalgh, David
dc.contributor.authorBaker, Sarah
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-23T05:20:54Z
dc.date.available2018-07-23T05:20:54Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn0038-0261
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1467-954X.12238
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/99197
dc.description.abstractThis chapter addresses work ‘segregation’ by sex in the cultural industries. We outline some of the main forms this takes, according to our observations: the high presence of women in marketing and public relations roles; the high numbers of women in production co-ordination and similar roles; the domination of men of more prestigious creative roles; and the domination by men of technical jobs. We then turn to explanation: what gender dynamics drive such patterns of work segregation according to sex? Drawing on interviews, we claim that the following stereotypes or prevailing discourses, concerning the distinctive attributes of women and men, may influence such segregation: that women are more caring, supportive and nurturing; that women are better communicators; that women are ‘better organized’; and that men are more creative because they are less bound by rules.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom23
dc.relation.ispartofpageto36
dc.relation.ispartofissueS1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalThe Sociological Review
dc.relation.ispartofvolume63
dc.subject.fieldofresearchGender Specific Studies
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSociology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode169901
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1608
dc.titleSex, gender and work segregation in the cultural industries
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright2015 The Authors. The Sociological Review published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Editorial Board of The Sociological Review. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBaker, Sarah L.


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