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dc.contributor.authorGrant-Smith, D
dc.contributor.authorOsborne, N
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-27T06:01:50Z
dc.date.available2019-02-27T06:01:50Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn0729-3682
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/07293682.2015.1135812
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/99339
dc.description.abstractThe idea of ‘wicked’ problems has made a valuable contribution to recognising the complexity and challenges of contemporary planning. However, some wicked policy problems are further complicated by a significant moral, psychological, religious or cultural dimension. This is particularly the case for problems that possess strong elements of abjection and symbolic pollution and high degrees of psychosocial sensitivity. Because this affects the way these problems are framed and discussed they are also characterised by high levels of verbal proscription. As a result, they are not discussed in the rational and emotion-free way that conventional planning demands and can become obscured or inadequately acknowledged in planning processes. This further contributes to their wickedness and intractability. Through paradigmatic urban planning examples, we argue that placing their unspeakable nature at the forefront of enquiry will enable planners to advocate for a more contextually and culturally situated approach to planning, which accommodates both emotional and embodied talk alongside more technical policy contributions. Re-imagining wicked problems in this way has the potential to enhance policy and plan-making and to disrupt norms, expose their contingency, and open new ways of planning for both the unspeakable and the merely wicked.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherRoutledge
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom46
dc.relation.ispartofpageto53
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Planner
dc.relation.ispartofvolume53
dc.subject.fieldofresearchUrban and Regional Planning not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHuman Geography not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Science and Management
dc.subject.fieldofresearchUrban and Regional Planning
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode120599
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160499
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0502
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1205
dc.subject.keywordsWicked problems
dc.subject.keywordsUnspeakable problems
dc.subject.keywordsSexscapes
dc.subject.keywordsNecrogeographies
dc.subject.keywordsDeathscapes
dc.subject.keywordsEmotional geographies
dc.titleDealing with discomfort: how the unspeakable confounds wicked planning problems
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorOsborne, Natalie J.


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