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dc.contributor.authorLatimer, Sharon
dc.contributor.authorChaboyer, Wendy
dc.contributor.authorGillespie, Brigid
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-23T03:14:27Z
dc.date.available2017-11-23T03:14:27Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn1037-6178
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10376178.2016.1190657
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/99450
dc.description.abstractBackground: Pressure injuries are a patient safety issue. Despite the suite of prevention strategies, sustained reductions in pressure injury prevalence rates have not been achieved. Generally, nurses are usually responsible for assessing patients’ pressure injury risk, and then implementing appropriate prevention strategies. The study aim was to describe five planned and implemented pressure injury prevention strategies (risk assessment, management plan, support surface, repositioning, and education), and determine if a relationship existed between the planning and implementation of support surfaces and regular repositioning. Method: An observational study collecting data using chart audits and semi-structured observations. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. This study was set in four medical units across two Australian metropolitan hospitals. The sample comprised adult medical inpatients with reduced mobility. A subsample of participants assessed at pressure injury risk on admission was drawn from this sample. Participants were aged ≥18 years, had a hospital length of stay of ≥3 days prior to recruitment, provided an informed consent, and had reduced mobility. Results: There was suboptimal planning and implementation of pressure injury prevention strategies for the sample and subsample. There was a significant relationship between planned and implemented support surfaces at both hospitals; however, no relationship existed between the planned and implemented of regular repositioning at either site. Conclusion: The planning and implementation of pressure injury strategies is haphazard. Patients received support surfaces; however, gaps exist in pressure injury risk assessment, management planning, regular repositioning, and patient education.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherRoutledge
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto15
dc.relation.ispartofjournalContemporary Nurse
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Nursing: Primary (Preventative)
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Nursing: Secondary (Acute Care)
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNursing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111002
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111003
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1110
dc.titlePressure injury prevention strategies in acute medical inpatients: an observational study
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Nursing and Midwifery
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorChaboyer, Wendy
gro.griffith.authorLatimer, Sharon
gro.griffith.authorGillespie, Brigid M.


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