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dc.contributor.authorGreen, Stephanie
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-11T23:08:25Z
dc.date.available2019-03-11T23:08:25Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn0961-2025
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09612025.2016.1166884
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/99620
dc.description.abstractInvestigating a body of archival manuscript research in any field can be a daunting undertaking, particularly when the relevant primary sources are scattered amongst a variety of public and private locations. The creation of a digital collection of privately held manuscripts and minutiae offers a boon to researchers who would otherwise be obliged to travel extensively. The digital collection can provide a means of transcending the boundary between private and public access, ensuring that crucial material evidence is available in the public domain. The author argues that the interpolation of personal archival materials within the context of the digital public sphere offers a mechanism for investigating sites of knowledge that may otherwise be obscured from history. In the context of women's historical studies, the digital collection offers a means of addressing the Victorian convention of a gendered boundary between private and public spheres. It can achieve this by making previously inaccessible cultural materials available for study and bringing to light work produced by figures who were not already well known. More significantly, it can support further investigation of the complex ways in which women and men were represented as public personae during the late-Victorian and Edwardian periods. This will be discussed with reference to archival material concerning Charlotte Carmichael Stopes and other prominent members of her family, suggesting that the creation of a Stopes digital archive exemplifies the value of such mechanisms for further research and scholarly discourse within the context of the digital public sphere.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto17
dc.relation.ispartofjournalWomen's History Review
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCommunication Technology and Digital Media Studies
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHistorical Studies
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode200102
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2103
dc.titleInclusions and Exclusions: Considerations for a Stopes Digital Collection
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionPost-print
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Humanities, Languages and Social Sciences
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.
gro.rights.copyright© 2016 Taylor & Francis (Routledge). This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Women's History Review on Inclusions and Exclusions: Considerations for a Stopes Digital Collection, available online: https://doi.org/10.1080/09612025.2016.1166884
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorGreen, Stephanie R.


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