Children with Down Syndrome Sharing Past Personal Event Narratives with Their Teacher Aides: A Pilot Study

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van Bysterveldt, Anne K
Westerveld, Marleen F
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2017
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Personal narrative ability is crucial for social–emotional well-being and classroom participation. This study investigated the ability of 10 school-age participants with Down syndrome to share past personal experiences with their teacher aides in their school environment. To participate, children were required to speak in short sentences and be largely intelligible to unfamiliar listeners. Personal narratives were elicited using photo prompts, comprising a set of the child’s own photographs and a standard set of photographs and accompanying verbal prompts, utilising a clinical language sampling protocol. Personal narratives were analysed on quality, syntactic complexity, verbal fluency and intelligibility. Examiner behaviour was evaluated for measures of syntactic complexity, mean turn length in utterances and number of utterances. Results indicated significant difficulties in producing quality personal narratives in both photo conditions. Examiner behaviour was negatively correlated to the participants’ spoken language performance. Clinical implications are highlighted.

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International Journal of Disability, Development and Education
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Education systems
Specialist studies in education
Special education and disability
Social work
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