A comprehensive test of the job demands-control interaction: Comparing two measures of job characteristics.

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Mansell, A
Brough, P
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Michael Innes

Date
2005
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Abstract

Empirical evidence for Karasek's (1979) job demands-control (JDC) interaction has been markedly inconsistent. It has been suggested that a failure to control for curvilinear relationships and the poor operationalisation of job control may be responsible for the lack of empirical support. The current research tests the interactive proposition using Karasek's (1979) operationalisations of job characteristics and Jackson, Wall, Martin, and Davids (1993) more focused measures of job demands and control. The analyses controlled for both neuroticism and curvilinear relationships. Limited support was demonstrated for the interaction hypothesis; only a significant interaction between Karasek's measures of skill utilisation and psychological demands in the prediction of job satisfaction was evident. No interaction was found with the Jackson et al. measures. It was concluded that job demands and job control predominantly act independently to influence levels of employee well-being and job satisfaction.

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Australian Journal of Psychology

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57

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2

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© 2004 Taylor & Francis : The author-version of this article will be available for download [12-18 months] after publication : Use hypertext link to access the publisher's version.

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Cognitive and computational psychology

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