A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescents With Body Dysmorphic Disorder

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
File version
Accepted Manuscript (AM)
Author(s)
Mataix-Cols, David
Fernandez de la Cruz, Lorena
Isomura, Kayoko
Anson, Martin
Turner, Cynthia
Monzani, Benedetta
Cadman, Jacinda
Bowyer, Laura
Heyman, Isobel
Veale, David
Krebs, Georgina
Griffith University Author(s)
Primary Supervisor
Other Supervisors
Editor(s)
Date
2015
Size
File type(s)
Location
License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Abstract

Objective: Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) typically starts in adolescence, but evidence-based treatments are yet to be developed and formally evaluated in this age group. We designed an age-appropriate cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) protocol for adolescents with BDD and evaluated its acceptability and efficacy in a pilot randomized controlled trial.

Method: Thirty adolescents aged 12 to 18 years (mean = 16.0, SD = 1.7) with a primary diagnosis of BDD, together with their families, were randomly assigned to 14 sessions of CBT delivered over 4 months or a control condition of equivalent duration, consisting of written psycho-education materials and weekly telephone monitoring. Blinded evaluators assessed participants at baseline, midtreatment, posttreatment, and at 2-month follow-up. The primary outcome measure was the Yale−Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale Modified for BDD, Adolescent Version (mean baseline score = 37.13, SD = 4.98, range = 24–43).

Results: The CBT group showed a significantly greater improvement than the control group, both at posttreatment (time × group interaction coefficient [95% CI] = −11.26 [−17.22 to −5.31]; p = .000) and at 2-month follow-up (time × group interaction coefficient [95% CI] = −9.62 [−15.74 to −3.51]; p = .002). Six participants (40%) in the CBT group and 1 participant (6.7%) in the control condition were classified as responders at both time points (χ 2 = 4.658, p = .031). Improvements were also seen on secondary measures, including insight, depression, and quality of life at posttreatment. Both patients and their families deemed the treatment as highly acceptable.

Conclusion: Developmentally tailored CBT is a promising intervention for young people with BDD, although there is significant room for improvement. Further clinical trials incorporating lessons learned in this pilot study and comparing CBT and pharmacological therapies, as well as their combination, are warranted.

Journal Title
Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Conference Title
Book Title
Edition
Volume
54
Issue
11
Thesis Type
Degree Program
School
Publisher link
Patent number
Funder(s)
Grant identifier(s)
Rights Statement
Rights Statement
© 2015 American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Ltd. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
Item Access Status
Note
Access the data
Related item(s)
Subject
Biomedical and clinical sciences
Psychology
Other psychology not elsewhere classified
Persistent link to this record
Citation
Collections