The disability self-direction movement: Considering the benefits and challenges for an Australian response

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Crozier, Michelle
Muenchberger, Heidi
Colley, Jacinta
Ehrlich, Carolyn
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2013
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Abstract

The following article provides a snapshot of the current self-direction movement within the disability sector across the industrialised world, with particular emphasis on the Australian context. As a global movement, self-direction has been in progress for several decades through a variety of implemented responses. Despite implementation variation, all self-direction models aim to facilitate individual control and decision making in care and support services. We describe self-direction, its various models and programs, and explore its benefits and challenges. We conclude by making broad recommendations for decision makers involved in self-direction. In particular, we offer a hierarchical decision tree that can be used to inform policy decisions at a systems - government policy - and organisational level.

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Australian Journal of Social Issues
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48
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4
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© 2013 ACOSS. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
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Human society
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