Health in prisoners in Fiji. Research Report.

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Winter, Rebecca
Kinner, Stuart
Saxton, Kate
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2013
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Abstract

Although Fiji is classified as a low prevalence country, HIV infection has increased steadily since 2001 and the current prevalence is thought to be underestimated due to low testing rates [1, 2]. Routinely collected data and behavioural surveys in Fiji have demonstrated a high prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) [3-6]. Globally, prisoners are known to be a group at higher risk of HIV infection [7-9], and following release into the community risky behaviours such as unprotected sex and alcohol and other drug (AOD) use have the potential to spread infection [10]. Although many prisoners experience multiple health problems [11-14] and are at higher risk of both contracting and transmitting infectious diseases [7-9, 15-18], little is known about what happens to them after release from prison [19]. This is important not only in terms of their own health care, but also in order to inform strategies to prevent the spread of infectious disease to others in the community [15, 20-22]. The Burnet Institute, in partnership with Fiji-based NGO Empower Pacific, was funded by the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) HIV and STI Response Fund competitive grants round to undertake research with people leaving prison in Fiji.

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Criminology not elsewhere classified
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