Stereotyped movements among children who are visually impaired

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Gal, Eynat
Dyck, Murray
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Date
2009
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Abstract

Does the severity of visual impairment affect the prevalence and severity of stereotyped movements? In this study, children who were blind or had low vision, half of whom had intellectual disabilities, were assessed. The results revealed that blindness and global delays were associated with more sensory processing dysfunction and more stereotyped movements.

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Journal of Visual Impairment and Blindness
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103
Issue
11
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File created October/13/2010. This is not the final version of record. This article was published in the Journal of Visual Impairment and Blindness (JVIB), Volume 103, issue 11, pp 754-765. The final version of record can be found at http:www/jvib.org.
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Subject
Sensory Processes, Perception and Performance
Medical and Health Sciences
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Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
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