Narrative insight into the influential macrosystem elements on children's resilience development in Taiwanese public preschools

No Thumbnail Available
File version
Author(s)
Lin, Kuan-Ling
Griffith University Author(s)
Primary Supervisor
Other Supervisors
Editor(s)

Susanne Garvis, Niklas Pramling

Date
2017
Size
File type(s)
Location
License
Abstract

The importance of resilience in preschoolers is it helps them adjust to their life difficulties (Lin, 2016). There are, however, gaps in resilience literature. First, there is a lack of resilience studies which focus on young children. Moreover, in Taiwan, the concept of developing resilience academically was roughly half a century behind the pioneering resilience longitudinal research conducted by Werner and Smith (1992) in the 1950s in the USA. When the initial resilience research quantitatively investigated the relations between resilience and protective and risk factors in various environments, the impacts of family and school factors on children’s resilience development were discovered in most of the Western literature. For example, the well-known risk factors were family separation (Werner & Smith, 1992), living in poverty or low socioeconomic status (Ratcliffe & McKernan, 2010), child abuse or neglect and adults’ depression (Rebekah et al., 2008), and low academic achievement (Henderson, 2012). Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological Systems Theory (BEST) incorporates these factors which occur in the family or school settings, in microsystems, which is the closest relationship between individuals and their surroundings (Bronfenbrenner, 1977).

Journal Title
Conference Title
Book Title

Narratives in Early Childhood Education: Communication, Sense Making and Lived Experience

Edition
Volume
Issue
Thesis Type
Degree Program
School
Patent number
Funder(s)
Grant identifier(s)
Rights Statement
Rights Statement
Item Access Status
Note
Access the data
Related item(s)
Subject

Early childhood education

Persistent link to this record
Citation
Collections