Engagement with different nightlife venues and frequent ecstasy use in a young adult population

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Leslie, Ellen M.
Smirnov, Andrew
Cherney, Adrian
Wells, Helene
Kemp, Robert
Legosz, Margot
Najman, Jake M.
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2015
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Aims: Little is known about the possible influence of different social settings on changes in patterns of ecstasy use over time. This study explores the relationship between engagement with different types of nightlife venues and subsequent frequent ecstasy use in an Australian young adult population sample. Methods: Longitudinal data are from a population-derived sample of Australian young adult ecstasy users (n = 265). Attendance at four types of venues (nightclubs, electronic dance music events/music festivals, venues playing live music, and pubs/bars) was measured at 6 months. Frequency of recent ecstasy use (last 12 months) was measured at 12 and 30 months. A prediction model of frequent ecstasy use at 30 months was developed using Poisson regression reporting adjusted relative risk. Findings: Regular attendance at nightclubs (≥monthly, adjusted relative risk 6.21, confidence interval 2.30–16.76) was associated with frequent ecstasy use at 30 months, independently of ecstasy use expectancies, ecstasy availability, ecstasy and methamphetamine dependence, frequent use of methamphetamine and alcohol, and other dimensions of ecstasy involvement (i.e. length of ecstasy use career and lifetime ecstasy consumption). Conclusions: Compared with attendees of other venues, nightclub attendees may be a special priority group for ecstasy harm and demand reduction interventions.

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Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy
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© 2015 Taylor & Francis. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy on 18 Feb 2015, available online: https://doi.org/10.3109/09687637.2015.1006179
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Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences not elsewhere classified
Public Health and Health Services
Policy and Administration
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