The Interaction of Natural and Vaccine-Induced Immunity with Social Distancing Predicts the Evolution of the COVID-19 Pandemic

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
File version
Version of Record (VoR)
Author(s)
Good, Michael F
Hawkes, Michael T
Griffith University Author(s)
Primary Supervisor
Other Supervisors
Editor(s)
Date
2020
Size
File type(s)
Location
License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Abstract

The existence and nature of immunity to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) are currently unknown; however, neutralizing antibodies are thought to play the major role and data from studying other coronaviruses suggest that partial clinical immunity lasting up to 1 year will occur postinfection. We show how immunity, depending on its durability, may work with current social practices to limit the spread of the virus. We further show that a vaccine that is 50% effective and taken by 50% of the population will prevent further loss of life, providing that social distancing is still practiced and that immunity does not wane quickly.

Journal Title
mBio
Conference Title
Book Title
Edition
Volume
Issue
Thesis Type
Degree Program
School
Publisher link
Patent number
Funder(s)
Grant identifier(s)
Rights Statement
© 2020 Good and Hawkes. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Rights Statement
Item Access Status
Note
Access the data
Related item(s)
Subject
Microbiology
COVID-19
SARS-CoV-2
immunity
public health
vaccines
Persistent link to this record
Citation
Good, MF; Hawkes, MT, The Interaction of Natural and Vaccine-Induced Immunity with Social Distancing Predicts the Evolution of the COVID-19 Pandemic., mBio, 2020, 11 (5), pp. e02617-20
Collections