Grass Strip Hydrology

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Ghadiri, Hossein
Rose, Calvin W
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Lal, R

Date
2017
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Abstract

The zone of hydraulic adjustment or backwater is a zone of considerable deposition from sediment-laden flow. The efficiency of the grass strips in slowing down the flow and unloading its sediment in the backwater region appears to be largely independent of the width of strips in the flow direction. The layer of deposited sediment formed in the backwater region tends to be richer in larger particles than the eroding sediment. Sediment size distribution appears to be a dominant factor governing the efficiency of the buffer strip in trapping sediment. Soil-sorbed nutrients and other agricultural chemicals are mainly attached to finer soil particles, which are more likely to pass through the strips largely unchanged. Thus the sediment that emerges from a buffer strip can be enriched in such chemicals relative to the eroding soil. Hence although buffer strips can be very efficient in forcing the deposition of suspended sediment in the backwater region on certain slopes, they are helpful, but less effective, in preventing chemical pollutants from entering surface water bodies.

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Encyclopedia of Soil Science

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3rd

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Environmental sciences

Science & Technology

Life Sciences & Biomedicine

Soil Science

Agriculture

SORBED CHEMICAL-TRANSPORT

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Ghadiri, H; Rose, CW, Grass Strip Hydrology, Encyclopedia of Soil Science, 3rd Edition, 2017, pp. 1024-1028

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