How do sex offenders think the police should interview to elicit confessions from sex offenders?

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
File version
Author(s)
Kebbell, Mark
Alison, Laurence
Hurren, Emily
Mazerolle, Paul
Griffith University Author(s)
Primary Supervisor
Other Supervisors
Editor(s)
Date
2010
Size

123447 bytes

File type(s)

application/pdf

Location
License
Abstract

The purpose of this study is to explore sex offenders' perceptions of how the police should interview suspected sex offenders to facilitate confessions, and to investigate whether there is a relationship between sex offenders' perceptions of how the police interviewed them and their decisions to confess or deny. Fortythree convicted sex offenders were interviewed using two 35-item questionnaires that contained five questions on each of seven interviewing strategies. An additional 20 violent offenders were included for comparison purposes. The strategies were evidence presenting strategies, ethical interviewing, displays of humanity, displays of dominance, use of minimization and maximization techniques, and demonstrating an understanding of sex offenders' cognitive distortions. One questionnaire concerned how the police should interview sex offenders and the other concerned how they perceived the police who interviewed them. Generally speaking, evidence presenting strategies, ethical interviewing, and displays of humanity were perceived to increase the likelihood of a confession. Interviewer dominance was perceived to be associated with a reduction in the likelihood of a confession.

Journal Title

Psychology, Crime & Law

Conference Title
Book Title
Edition
Volume

16

Issue

7

Thesis Type
Degree Program
School
Publisher link
Patent number
Funder(s)
Grant identifier(s)
Rights Statement
Rights Statement

© 2010 Routledge. This is an electronic version of an article published in Psychology, Crime & Law, Volume 16, Issue 7 September 2010 , pages 567 - 584. Psychology, Crime & Law is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com with the open URL of your article.

Item Access Status
Note
Access the data
Related item(s)
Subject

Criminology

Criminology not elsewhere classified

Applied and developmental psychology

Cognitive and computational psychology

Persistent link to this record
Citation
Collections