Susceptibility of amphibians to chytridiomycosis is associated with MHC class II conformation

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Bataille, Arnaud
Cashins, Scott D
Grogan, Laura
Skerratt, Lee F
Hunter, David
McFadden, Michael
Scheele, Benjamin
Brannelly, Laura A
Macris, Amy
Harlow, Peter S
Bell, Sara
Berger, Lee
Waldman, Bruce
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2015
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The pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) can cause precipitous population declines in its amphibian hosts. Responses of individuals to infection vary greatly with the capacity of their immune system to respond to the pathogen. We used a combination of comparative and experimental approaches to identify major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) alleles encoding molecules that foster the survival of Bd-infected amphibians. We found that Bd-resistant amphibians across four continents share common amino acids in three binding pockets of the MHC-II antigen binding groove. Moreover, strong signals of selection acting on these specific sites were evident among all species co-existing with the pathogen. In the laboratory, we experimentally inoculated Australian tree frogs with Bd to test how each binding pocket conformation influences disease resistance. Only the conformation of MHC-II pocket 9 of surviving subjects matched those of Bd-resistant species. This MHC-II conformation thus may determine amphibian resistance to Bd, although other MHC-II binding pockets also may contribute to resistance. Rescuing amphibian biodiversity will depend on our understanding of amphibian immune defence mechanisms against Bd. The identification of adaptive genetic markers for Bd resistance represents an important step forward towards that goal.

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Royal Society of London. Proceedings B. Biological Sciences

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282

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1805

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© 2015 The Authors. Published by the Royal Society under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/, which permits unrestricted use, provided the original author and source are credited.

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Conservation and biodiversity

Biological sciences

Agricultural, veterinary and food sciences

Biomedical and clinical sciences

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