Potential value of weedy regrowth for rainforest restoration

No Thumbnail Available
File version
Author(s)
Kanowski, J
Catterall, CP
Neilan, W
Griffith University Author(s)
Primary Supervisor
Other Supervisors
Editor(s)

Tein McDonald

Date
2008
Size
File type(s)
Location
License
Abstract

In subtropical Australia, regrowth forests in former rainforest landscapes are often dominated by the exotic tree, Camphor Laurel (Cinnamomum camphora). In this paper, we report on research into the value of these regrowth stands for rainforest biota. Our initial surveys indicated that Camphor Laurel stands supported a similar number of rainforest animals as restoration plantings, and usually more than timber plantations. Subsequent surveys found that stands of Camphor Laurel supported a high diversity of fruit-eating birds and had recruited a diverse suite of rainforest plants. More recently, we surveyed stands of Camphor Laurel treated by restoration practitioners using 'patch' or 'selective' removal of exotic plants. We found that both treatment methods accelerated the recruitment of rainforest plants to Camphor Laurel stands, and that treatment was usually much cheaper than the cost of establishing restoration plantings. Recognition of the value of weedy regrowth for native plants and animals, and the potential utility of manipulating weedy regrowth to achieve cost-effective restoration, could increase the likelihood of achieving the large-scale increases in forest cover that will be needed to restore biodiversity and ecosystem services to extensively-cleared regions.

Journal Title

Ecological Management and Restoration

Conference Title
Book Title
Edition
Volume

9

Issue

2

Thesis Type
Degree Program
School
Publisher link
Patent number
Funder(s)
Grant identifier(s)
Rights Statement
Rights Statement
Item Access Status
Note
Access the data
Related item(s)
Subject

Environmental sciences

Biological sciences

Agricultural, veterinary and food sciences

Persistent link to this record
Citation
Collections