Modern primitives leaping and stomping the earth: From Ballet to bush doofs

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
File version
Author(s)
Haebich, Anna
Taylor, Jodie
Griffith University Author(s)
Primary Supervisor
Other Supervisors
Editor(s)

Kitty Eggerking (volume editor)

Date
2007
Size

151336 bytes

File type(s)

application/pdf

Location
License
Abstract

In the colonial history of black and white Australia, there are few recorded instances of public performances that draw together the traditions of Aboriginal and settler dance cultures to create mutually constitutive corporeal dialogues. Aboriginal academic Marcia Langton argues in an oft-quoted observation that settler experiences of Aboriginal culture have remained over time primarily visual and distant, both spatially and culturally, rather than embodied and contingent. It is not surprising, then, that settler encounters with Aboriginal performance have manifested primarily in spectatorship rather than interaction. In this paper, we explore two uncommon examples of embodied performance by non-Indigenous dancers directly inspired by white imaginings of Aboriginal culture. Exercising concern regarding the motivations and political implications of performance, we first examine the modernist ballet Corroboree (1954) and subsequently the neo-corroborees of contemporary ‘bush doof’ culture.

Journal Title

Aboriginal History

Conference Title
Book Title
Edition
Volume

31

Issue
Thesis Type
Degree Program
School
DOI
Patent number
Funder(s)
Grant identifier(s)
Rights Statement
Rights Statement

© 2007 Aboriginal History. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.

Item Access Status
Note
Access the data
Related item(s)
Subject

Literary Studies

Other Language, Communication and Culture

Historical Studies

Persistent link to this record
Citation
Collections