Acute rheumatic fever – Clinical vigilance is essential for primary prevention to be successful and avoid lifelong rheumatic heart disease (Editorial)

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Speed, Janelle
Margolis, Stephen A
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2021
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As we slowly move towards a post-COVID-19 world, it is timely to revisit the ongoing disparity in health outcomes across Australia. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people continue to experience lower life expectancy and higher morbidity than other Australians.1 Closing the Gap began in 2007, aiming to ‘close the health and life expectancy gap between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and non-Indigenous Australians … by 2030’.2 However, at the 10-year review in 2018, it was clear that the gap is not closing.2

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Australian Journal of General Practice
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Speed, J; Margolis, SA, Acute rheumatic fever – Clinical vigilance is essential for primary prevention to be successful and avoid lifelong rheumatic heart disease (Editorial), Australian Journal of General Practice, 2021, 50 (5), pp. 261-261. Available at https://dx.doi.org/10.31128/AJGP-05-21-1234e
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Clinical sciences
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Speed, J; Margolis, SA, Acute rheumatic fever – Clinical vigilance is essential for primary prevention to be successful and avoid lifelong rheumatic heart disease (Editorial), Australian Journal of General Practice, 2021, 50 (5), pp. 261-261
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