Companion animal death and client bereavement: A qualitative investigation of veterinary nurses’ caregiving experiences

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Deacon, RE
Brough, P
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2019
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Abstract

Veterinary paraprofessionals are routinely confronted with companion animal death and client bereavement throughout their day-to-day work. However, research exploring the nature and psychological impact of these end-of-life encounters among veterinary paraprofessionals is scarce. To address this knowledge gap, we conducted an exploratory qualitative investigation involving semi-structured interviews with 26 veterinary nurses. Thematic analysis identified three major themes within the data: (1) Contextual nuances; (2) Relational dynamics; and (3) Cumulative impact. Findings revealed a number of previously unexplored situational and relational complexities influencing veterinary nurses’ appraisals of these responsibilities, and their associated psychological outcomes.

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Death Studies
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Psychology
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Deacon, RE; Brough, P, Companion animal death and client bereavement: A qualitative investigation of veterinary nurses’ caregiving experiences, Death Studies, 2019, pp. 1-12
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