The Neighbourhood Context of Urban Aboriginal Crime

No Thumbnail Available
File version
Author(s)
T. Fitzgerald, Robin
J. Carrington, Peter
Griffith University Author(s)
Primary Supervisor
Other Supervisors
Editor(s)
Date
2008
Size
File type(s)
Location
License
Abstract

This article addresses Carol La Prairie's (1992; 2002) hypothesis that the over-representation of Aboriginal people in the Canadian criminal justice system is, to a considerable extent, due to their disadvantaged urban living conditions. Specifically, it investigates the sources of the high level of police-reported Aboriginal crime in Winnipeg in 2001. Geocoded crime incident data from the incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and Census data for the City of Winnipeg are combined in a neighbourhood-level ecological analysis of urban Aboriginal crime. The results indicate that a substantial part of the elevated level of police-reported Aboriginal crime is explained by the structural characteristics of the neighbourhoods in which Aboriginal people tend to live. These results confirm La Prairie's hypothesis and point to the importance of considering community conditions in understanding and preventing crime.

Journal Title

Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice

Conference Title
Book Title
Edition
Volume

50

Issue

5

Thesis Type
Degree Program
School
Patent number
Funder(s)
Grant identifier(s)
Rights Statement
Rights Statement

Self-archiving of the author-manuscript version is not yet supported by this journal. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version or contact the author[s] for more information.

Item Access Status
Note
Access the data
Related item(s)
Subject

Causes and Prevention of Crime

Criminology

Law

Persistent link to this record
Citation
Collections