Anti-adhesive activity of extracts from edible and medicinal mushrooms against Campylobacter jejuni

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Chamiolo, J
Oehrke, D
Schmidt, K
Bensch, K
Tiralongo, J
Lindequist, U
Tiralongo, E
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2012
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Berlin

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Campylobacter jejuni is one of the most common bacterial causes of diarrhoea in the industrialised world [1], being associated with the occurrence of Guillain-Barr頓yndrome (GBS) [2] and induces diseases partially through intestinal adherence [3]. With increasing reports of C. jejuni drug resistance against standard antibiotics [4] investigations into anti-adhesive agents for the prevention of bacterial infection [5] are highly significant, particularly given the possibility of avoiding resistance [6]. Different studies have shown anti-adhesive activity of different plant compounds against a variety of bacteria including C. jejuni [5]. Although two studies report on anti-adhesive effects of fungal compounds/extracts against yeast [7] and virus [8], this is the first study that describes anti-adhesive effects of basidiomycetes against any bacteria. Nineteen extracts from 9 edible and medicinal mushroom species (Calvatia gigantea, Flammulina velutipes, Inonotus obliquus, Inonotus hispidus, Inonotus nodulosus, Inonotus dryadeus, Ganoderma lucidum, Ganoderma pfeifferi, Piptoporus betulinus) were screened for anti-adhesive activity against C. jejuni using modifications of previously published anti-adhesion assays [9, 10]. The 2 ethanolic extracts derived from the fruiting bodies of Inonotus nodulosus and Inonotus obliquus showed high anti-adhesive activity (IC50 0.017mg/mL and IC50 0.021mg/mL, respectively). Moreover, the methanolic extracts of the fruiting bodies of Calvatia gigantea and Piptoporus betulinus showed, although not dose dependent, high anti-adhesive activity (81%ᱳ% and 71%ᱰ%, respectively) at 0.002mg/mL. Further investigations need to be conducted to evaluate whether isolated compounds would be candidates for the development of novel drugs against bacterial adhesion.

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MYCOSES

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55

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Clinical sciences

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