Contribution of soil seed banks to vegetation resilience in coastal freshwater wetlands of subtropical Australia [Dataset]

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Author(s)
Grieger, Rebekah
Capon, Samantha J
Hadwen, Wade L
Mackey, Brendan
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Date
2024-01-17
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116kb

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.xlsx

Location

Coastal wetlands, South East Queensland, Australia

Abstract

Questions: What role do soil seed banks play in the resilience of coastal freshwater wetland vegetation communities? How might soil seed bank composition and similarity to standing vegetation drive changes in vegetation expression, particularly given projected changes in climate? Location: Sixty wooded coastal freshwater wetlands in southeast Queensland, Australia Methods: We surveyed standing vegetation and investigated soil seed bank composition through an 8-month long emergence experiment. Results: Soil seed bank assemblages were dominated by forb and sedge species (23 % exotic), but composition varied throughout the study region. Spatial (north-south) and land use (urban-rural) gradients explained some variation in soil seed bank composition. Soil moisture and groundwater dependence also influenced species distributions, particularly for freshwater wetland species. Similarity of soil seed banks to standing vegetation was low. Species present in both extant and soil seed bank assemblages were commonly native wetland taxa, including one saltmarsh species (Juncus kraussii). Conclusions: Projected climatic changes will likely drive changes in coastal freshwater wetland vegetation communities through increases in the frequency and intensity of disturbances (e.g., storm surge). Our results suggest that regeneration from soil seed banks could promote four potential scenarios; 1) expansion of weed communities, 2) expansion of saltmarsh communities, 3) maintenance and expansion of wetland/terrestrial species, and 4) transformation to an unvegetated open water zone due to reduced regeneration success under changing conditions. These diverse vegetation futures highlight the vulnerability of wooded coastal freshwater wetlands and the need for research and management interventions to maintain their biodiversity and ecosystem services.

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Rights Statement

© 2024. The authors own copyright in this dataset. The data has been made available under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution license (CC BY 4.0)

Item Access Status

Open access. Access data and code via the 'Access the data' link. If you use this dataset in your own work, please cite it using the citation provided below.

Analysis code: Made available under the terms of the MIT license. © 2024 Rebekah Grieger. If you use this code, please cite it: Grieger, R. (2024). Analysis code for contribution of soil seed banks to vegetation resilience in coastal freshwater wetlands of subtropical Australia [Software]. Griffith University.

Note

Supports: Grieger et al. 2024. Contribution of soil seed banks to vegetation resilience in coastal freshwater wetlands of subtropical Australia. Journal of Vegetation Science. https://doi.org/10.1111/jvs.13234

Related item(s)
Subject

Climate change impacts and adaptation

Ecological applications

Environmental management

Soil sciences

wetland vegetation

coastal wetlands

seed bank

climate change

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Citation

Grieger, R., Capon, S.J., Hadwen, W.L., Mackey, B. (2024). Contribution of soil seed banks to vegetation resilience in coastal freshwater wetlands of subtropical Australia [dataset]. Griffith University. https://doi.org/10.25904/1912/5139

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