Physical restraint of patients in Australia and New Zealand intensive care units

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Maiden, MJ
Bone, A
Fitzpatrick, M
Hammond, N
Knowles, S
Gao, A
Li, Y
Myburgh, J
Seppelt, I
Grattan, S
Nangla, C
Duke, G
Shelton, A
Sosnowski, K
et al.
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2020
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Abstract

Dear Editor, Physical restraint of patients in an intensive care unit (ICU) varies between countries. Some apply physical restraints on most ICU patients, while others report never using them [1]. In Australia/New Zealand, a point prevalence study 10 years ago reported that 7% of ICU patients were physically restrained, but provided little other detail about their use [2]. We conducted a study to examine whether the prevalence of physical restraint has changed over a decade, and to understand how restraints are used.

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Intensive Care Medicine

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This publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.

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Clinical sciences

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Maiden, et al., Physical restraint of patients in Australia and New Zealand intensive care units, Intensive Care Medicine, 2020

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