Using willingness to pay to establish patient preferences for peripheral intravenous catheter securement in an australian emergency department

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
File version
Version of Record (VoR)
Author(s)
Scott, M
Bugden, S
Hocking, J
Mervin, MC
Rickard, CM
Griffith University Author(s)
Primary Supervisor
Other Supervisors
Editor(s)
Date
2020
Size
File type(s)
Location
License
Abstract

Objective To assess patients’ willingness to pay ( WTP) for adding cyanoacrylate to the peripheral intravenous catheter (PIVC) insertion site to reduce catheter failure at 48 hours. Background Cyanoacrylate has been associated with a reduction in PIVC failure rate but at a material increased cost of approximately 20%. Due to the discomfort associated with PIVC replacement, we hypothesised that patients would put value on avoiding such a replacement PIVC and sought to estimate that value. Methods One hundred adult patients presenting to a regional Australian emergency department (ED) and who had a PIVC inserted were surveyed. Results Thirty three patients would pay AU$70 to add cyanoacrylate to the standard PIVC, 32 were not willing to pay, and 35 would pay less than $70. Conclusions The average WTP for a novel PIVC securement method was AU$31.06, which is greater than the cost of using the securement method.

Journal Title
Vascular Access
Conference Title
Book Title
Edition
Volume
Issue
Thesis Type
Degree Program
School
Publisher link
Patent number
Funder(s)
Grant identifier(s)
Rights Statement
© 2020 Australian Vascular Access Society. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
Rights Statement
Item Access Status
Note
Access the data
Related item(s)
Subject
Cardiovascular medicine and haematology
Health services and systems
Public health
Health economics
Persistent link to this record
Citation
Scott, M; Bugden, S; Hocking, J; Mervin, MC; Rickard, CM, Using willingness to pay to establish patient preferences for peripheral intravenous catheter securement in an australian emergency department, Vascular Access, 2020, 6 (2), pp. 6-8
Collections