Evaluation Of The Packed Cell Volume (PCV) As A Potential Screening Tool For Iron Deficiency Anaemia Among Under-5 Children In A Resource Limited Setting

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Ekwochi, Uchenna
Ifediora, Chris
Osuorah, C.
Ndu, I.
Amadi, O.
Odetunde, I.
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2015
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Abstract

In resource-limited settings as seen in developing countries, most clinicians use cheap and readily available tests to diagnose and treat iron-deficiency anaemia. Some of these tests have no proven statistical correlation with iron deficiencies, which is usually diagnosed with iron studies, represented by the serum Ferritin level. This study aims to correlate the Packed Cell Volume (PCV), a widely used parameter in these settings, to the Serum Ferritin (SF), so as to evaluate its usefulness as an alternative parameter in diagnosing iron deficiency. The study was a cross sectional and analytical survey of 356 children aged 2-59 months. Their PCVs and SF were obtained and correlated using IBM_SPSS Version 22. The result obtained using the Pearson Correlation Coefficient, revealed a statistically insignificant, very weak, negative association between PCV and SF in both groups. The coefficients were -0.089 (p-value 0.237) and -0.101 (p-value 0.182) respectively for the anaemic and non-anaemic groups. We conclude that there is no correlation between PCV and serum Ferritin, and therefore recommends that the PCV should not be used as a screening tool for iron-deficiency.

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Journal of Experimental Research

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3

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2

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© The Author(s) 2015. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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Primary Health Care

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