Practicing in a person-centred environment – self-help groups in psycho-social rehabilitation

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Landstad, Bodil J
Hedlund, Marianne
Kendall, Elizabeth
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2020
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Abstract

Aim: The increasing prevalence of chronic conditions and impairments in the population is putting new demands on health and rehabilitation services. Research on self-help groups suggest that participation in these groups might have a positive impact on people who are struggling with chronic illnesses or disabilities. In this study, we explore person-centred support in which participants in self-help groups are undergoing rehabilitation to develop their knowledge, skills and confidence necessary to handle life’s challenges. Method: The design is exploratory, analysing data from informant interviews and focus groups (a total of 32 participants) using a Grounded Theory inspired approach to analyse. The participants were rehabilitation clients aged between 20 and 60 years; eight were men and twenty-six were women. Results: Three main categories emerged as being important self-help processes that were likely to promote positive rehabilitation outcomes: (1) Learning and practicing safely, (2) A refuge from expectations, (3) Internal processes that accentuate the positives. Conclusion: Peer support delivered through the structured self-help environment can facilitate the development of new self-awareness, promote acceptance and adjustment, facilitate the establishment of new skills and enable transfer of learning to new environments, including the workplace.IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION Self-help groups may support the process of rehabilitation. Participating in self-help groups provides an enabling context for individuals to address challenges and limitations. Peer support delivered through the structured self-help environment can facilitate the development of new self-awareness, promote adjustment, and facilitate the establishment of new skills. Participating in peer led self-help groups can assist with the transfer of learning to new environments, including development of potential work capacity.

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Disability and Rehabilitation

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© 2020 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, and is not altered, transformed, or built upon in any way.

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This publication has been entered in Griffith Research Online as an advanced online version.

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Biomedical and clinical sciences

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Life Sciences & Biomedicine

Rehabilitation

Self-care

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Landstad, BJ; Hedlund, M; Kendall, E, Practicing in a person-centred environment – self-help groups in psycho-social rehabilitation, Disability and Rehabilitation, 2020

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