A Comparison of Benzodiazepine and related drug use in Nova Scotia and Australia

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Smith, Alesha J
Sketris, Ingrid
Cooke, Charmaine
Gardner, David
Kisely, Steve
Tett, Susan E
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Dr. Quentin Rae-Grant (Editor-in-Chief)

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2008
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Abstract

Objective: Benzodiazepines can be a problem if used for long periods, or in at-risk populations, such as the elderly. We compared the use of benzodiazepine and related prescription medicines in Nova Scotia and Australia. Methods: The Nova Scotia Pharmacare Program and the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme in Australia were used to obtain dispensing data in comparable populations for all publicly subsidized benzodiazepines and related compounds. Usage was compared from 2000 to 2003, using the World Health Organization anatomical therapeutic chemical and defined daily dosage (DDD) system. We also determined differences in the types of benzodiazepines prescribed. Results: The use of benzodiazepines increased at a steady but comparable rate in both areas. However, the use of benzodiazepines in Nova Scotia was more than double that of Australia in 2000 (123 and 48 DDD/1000 beneficiaries per day, respectively) through 2003 (138 and 57 DDD/1000 beneficiaries per day, respectively). Eight different benzodiazepines made up 90% of the drug use in Nova Scotia by contrast to only 4 different benzodiazepines in Australia. Conclusions: Large differences exist between the type and rate of benzodiazepine prescribing in Nova Scotia and Australia, with Nova Scotia reporting more than twice as much use. Benzodiazepine use in both jurisdictions is increasing. The Canadian findings are especially concerning as benzodiazepine use in the Atlantic provinces has been reported to be less than other provinces. The variations between the 2 jurisdictions may be due to factors such as fewer benzodiazepines available in Australia, differences in prescriber, patient attitudes and behaviours, or different initiatives to influence benzodiazepine use.

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Canadian Journal of Psychiatry

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53

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8

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© 2008 Canadian Psychiatric Association. Self-archiving of the author-manuscript version is not yet supported by this publisher. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version or contact the author for more information.

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Biomedical and clinical sciences

Psychology

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