The effect of tissue molecules on bacterial invasion of dentine

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Love, RM
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2002
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Abstract

Bacterial invasion of dentinal tubules is a critical step in the pathogenesis of dental caries and pulp and periapical disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect some molecules commonly found in saliva and dentinal tubule fluid may have on the bacterial invasion of dentine. The results showed that invasion of Streptococcus gordonii or Enterococcus faecalis cells was inhibited when the bacterial cells were in solution with mucin, immunoglobulin G (IgG) and serum, and this was related to bacterial cell aggregation, as a result of interaction with agglutinins, and/or inhibition of collagen binding. When dentine was soaked in growth media containing fibrinogen, IgG, albumin or serum prior to inoculation, bacterial invasion was inhibited. It is suggested that this may be due to reduced dentine permeability as a consequence of the deposition of the compounds within dentinal tubules.

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Oral Microbiology and Immunology

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17

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1

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Dentistry

Dentistry not elsewhere classified

Immunology

Medical microbiology

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