Loss and recovery of carbon and nitrogen after mangrove clearing

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
File version

Accepted Manuscript (AM)

Author(s)
Adame, MF
Zakaria, RM
Fry, B
Chong, VC
Then, YHA
Brown, CJ
Lee, SY
Griffith University Author(s)
Primary Supervisor
Other Supervisors
Editor(s)
Date
2018
Size
File type(s)
Location
Abstract

Offsetting carbon (C) emissions and reducing nitrogen (N) pollution have been goals of mangrove restoration programs around the world. There is a common, yet dubious expectation that mangrove restoration will result in immediate and perpetual delivery of ecosystem services. There are expected time lags between mangrove clearing and C and N losses, and between restoration and C and N gains. Obtaining accurate rates of losses and gains requires frequent and long-term sampling, which is expensive and time consuming. To address this knowledge gap, we used a chronosequence of mangrove forests in mangroves in Matang Mangrove Forest Reserve (MMFR) in Malaysia, a region with one of the most C dense forests in the world. In this site, we assessed the ecosystem C and N stocks, including soil, downed wood, downed litter, and trees. The objective was to measure C and N changes through time. After mangrove clearing, C and N losses in soil and downed wood were rapid, with stocks halved after just one year. In the first 10 years after replantation, the forest recovered quickly, with rates of C accumulation of 9.5 Mg C ha−1 yr−1. After ten years, the rate of accumulation decreased to 2.8 Mg C ha−1 yr−1. However, 40 years after replantation, mangroves were still about 26% lower in C and 15% lower in N compared to our reference forest. The trajectory of recovery of C and N stocks in these forests was different among mangrove components: forest litter recovered rapidly, but downed wood and soil recovered much slower. Programs aimed at reducing C emissions and N pollution should consider that there are temporal lags and ecosystem trade-offs when assessing the effectiveness of mangrove protection and restoration as climate change mitigation strategies.

Journal Title

Ocean & Coastal Management

Conference Title
Book Title
Edition
Volume

161

Issue
Thesis Type
Degree Program
School
Publisher link
Patent number
Funder(s)
Grant identifier(s)
Rights Statement
Rights Statement

© 2018 Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.

Item Access Status
Note
Access the data
Related item(s)
Subject

Earth sciences

Environmental sciences

Marine and estuarine ecology (incl. marine ichthyology)

Human society

Persistent link to this record
Citation
Collections