Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) expatriates

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McPhail, R
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Yvonne McNulty, Jan Selmer

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2017
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Past research on expatriates has focused largely on traditional expatriation which generally emphasizes heterosexual couples with a male expatriate and female trailing spouse, or a dual-career couple and children (e.g., Harvey et al., 2009; Haslberger and Brewster, 2008). Despite there being little research on non-traditional expatriation (see McNulty and Hutching’s 2016 review), including lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) expatriates, there has been an increased interest of late and the number of studies has grown since 2012 (e.g., Gedro, 2010; McPhail et al., 2016). Gedro et al. (2013, p. 282) define LGBT expatriates as constituting ‘a sexual minority . . . of people that cross international borders for professional reasons’. It is understood that ‘expatriation is a key element of multinational corporations’ (MNCs) strategies for maximizing and broadening the use of global talent and increasing firm performance, levels of international diversity and subsidiary labour productivity’ (McPhail et al., 2016, p. 382). What is less clear is how organizations can meet the growing need for talent to expatriate. Haas et al. (2007) propose that LGBT employees are often in more senior positions within management in proportion to their heterosexual counterparts, which increases the likelihood that they make up a significant number of the top 10 per cent of talent often targeted for international assignments.

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Research Handbook of Expatriates

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Sociology not elsewhere classified

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