Can History Help Us Navigate Climate Change? Practical Lessons from the Past

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Bussey, Marcus
Carter, Bill (R.W.)
Carter, Jennifer
Mangoyana, Robert
Matthews, Julie
Nash, Denzil
Oliver, Jeanette
Richards, Russell
Thomsen, Dana
Sano, Marcello
Smith, Tim
Weber, Estelle
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Engineers Australia

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2010
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Melbourne

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This paper will reflect on the report "Societal Responses to Significant Change: An Historical Analysis" an early deliverable in the Australian Government funded South East Queensland Climate Adaptation Research Initiative (SEQCARI). Societal Responses to Significant Change looked at 33 case studies developed by 12 researchers that illustrate the range of contextual responses to change in order to better understand the historical precedents for human adaptive capacity. The paper argues that social learning, and therefore adaptive capacity, does not occur in a vacuum. The historical profiling of responses to significant change illustrates how a range of factors contribute to a society's success or failure. These profiles take the form of scenarios that ground reflection on the future in how human societies and institutions have responded to challenges in the past. Ultimately it is argued that historical consciousness deepens human adaptive capacity and facilitates practical engagement with climate change.

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Practical Responses to Climate Change National Conference 2010

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Self-archiving of the author-manuscript version is not yet supported by this conference Please refer to the conference link for access to the definitive, published version or contact the authors for more information

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Environmental Management

Historical Studies not elsewhere classified

Social Change

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