Crime and Criminal Justice Research: Australia and its Region

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Finnane, Mark
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2017
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Research on crime and criminal justice history for Australia and its region is almost entirely restricted chronologically to the period since 1788. That was the year when transported convicts sentenced in England first landed at their destination in Botany Bay.
The geo-temporal location of the area ‘Australia and its region’ is one defined initially by the region’s imperial and colonial histories. 1 The dominant imperial power was Britain, and its proxies, the British-populated settler colonies of Australia and New Zealand. Australia itself became an imperial power through its role in annexing part of its northern neighbour New Guinea after 1885. Other European imperial powers played a role in the region, especially the Dutch in the East Indies and extending to the western part of New Guinea, the French especially in New Caledonia which it used as a convict colony, the Germans, also in New Guinea, and the Portuguese in East Timor. The islands of the south-west Pacific were variously absorbed by these European powers during the late nineteenth-century imperial expansion. And briefly in the twentieth century they were also controlled by the Japanese imperial expansion into the south Pacific.

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Crime, Histoire & Sociétés

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21

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2

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Historical Studies

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Finnane, M, Crime and Criminal Justice Research: Australia and its Region, Crime, Histoire & Sociétés, 2017, (Vol. 21, n°2), pp. 183-194

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