Neuroscience of Motivation and Organizational Behavior: Putting the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST) to Work

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Corr, PJ
McNaughton, N
Wilson, MR
Hutchison, A
Burch, G
Poropat, A
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Sung-il Kim, Johnmarshall Reeve, Mimi Bong

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2016
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Abstract

Neuroscience research on human motivation in the workplace is still in its infancy. There is a large industrial and organizational (IO) psychology literature containing numerous theories of motivation, relating to prosocial and productive, and, less so, “darker” antisocial and counter-productive, behaviors. However, the development of a viable over-arching theoretical framework has proved elusive. In this chapter, we argue that basic neuropsychological systems related to approach, avoidance, and their conflict, may provide such a framework, one which we discuss in terms of the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST) of personality. We argue that workplace behaviors may be understood by reference to the motivational types that are formed from the combination of basic approach, avoidance, and conflict-related personalities. We offer suggestions for future research to explore workplace behaviors in terms of the wider literature on the neuroscience of motivation.

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Recent Developments in Neuroscience Research on Human Motivation

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Other psychology not elsewhere classified

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