Can Gratitude and Kindness Interventions Enhance Well-being in a Clinicaal Sample?

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Kerr, Shelley L
O'Donovan, Analise
Pepping, Christopher A
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2015
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Abstract

Grounded in Fredrickson's (Rev Gen Psychol 2(3):300-319, 1998) broaden and build model of positive emotions, the current study examines the efficacy of 2-week self-administered gratitude and kindness interventions within a clinical sample on a waiting-list for outpatient psychological treatment. Results demonstrate that we can reliably cultivate the emotional experiences of gratitude but not kindness in this brief period. Further, both the gratitude and kindness interventions built a sense of connectedness, enhanced satisfaction with daily life, optimism, and reduced anxiety compared to a placebo condition. These brief interventions did not impact on more overarching constructs, including general psychological functioning and meaning in life. These findings demonstrate that gratitude and kindness have a place in clinical practice; not just as end states, but as emotional experiences that can stimulate constructive change. Further, these strategies can serve as useful pre-treatment interventions that may reduce the negative impact of long waiting times before psychological treatment.

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Journal of Happiness Studies

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Cognitive and computational psychology

Applied and developmental psychology

Clinical and health psychology

Social and personality psychology

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